News

If we are to reduce the level of entrenched disadvantage in Australia, we need to change priorities within government, and confront the fundamental inequality that places the voices of communities, charities and broader civil society at the bottom of the political influence pile, writes CCA CEO David Crosbie, in Pro Bono News, 30 August 2018.

For the Department of the Environment and Energy to grant over $440 million to a small charity that didn’t even prepare an application form or ask for the grant is inconceivable, writes CCA CEO David Crosbie in Pro Bono News, 16 August 2018.

CCA's submission outlines key areas of opportunity and concern in relation to the Senate Select Committee Inquiry into Charitable Fundraising.

CCA welcomes the opportunity to engage with the Senate Select Committee on this very important issue.

CCA is a member of the fixfundraising coalition, has liaised extensively with Justice Connect and supports their submission.  Parts of this submission reflect this convergence.

Public service reform in Australia seems like a constantly moving weather front, lots of clouds, the occasional flash of lightning or thunder, but bringing no rain and little change in temperature, writes CEO David Crosbie in Pro Bono News, Refrorming or Redecorating? 

This submission outlines key areas of opportunity and concern for the Community Council for Australia (CCA) in relation to the Independent Review of the Australian Public Service (the Review).

CCA welcomes the opportunity to engage with the Review and its work to improve the capability and performance of the Australian Public Service, and is keen to engage in further discussion as the Review’s recommendations are developed and considered.

When it comes to investigating Catholic Education Melbourne, nothing seen in the last few days suggests the ACNC is doing anything other than what a good regulator should do, writes Community Council for Australia CEO David Crosbie in Pro Bono News, 19 July 2018.

CCA commends the government on pursuing an Open Government agenda.  Greater transparency, participation and accountability in government will drive real improvements in performance and better outcomes for the Australian community.  However, this requires governments to commit to collecting and making public a much higher level of outcome and impact reporting, not just of the services they contract, but of their own performance in achieving government policy goals.

The Parliamentary Joint Committee on Intelligence and Security tabled its report on 25 June, with bi-partisan support for 52 recommendations regarding the Foreign Influence Transparency Bill.

CCA and charities across our sector welcomed the Committee's recommendation to provide an exemption for registered charities to ensure the Bill does not unnecessarily snare and impede Australian charities simply going about their work, in pursuit of their charitable purpose. 

Governments need to recognise that national security is about much more than international threats. If they focused more attention on the safety of women and less on curtailing freedoms in the name of national security, Australia would not only be safer, but more like the Australia we all want to live in., writes CCA CEO, David Crosbie in Pro Bono News, 22 June 2018.

CCA generally welcomes the intention of the amendments proposed by Attorney General, Christian Porter - but calls for areas of uncertainty to be resolved -  and remains confused as to why charities pursuing their charitable purpose are not excluded when business groups, non-charitable peak bodies and others are exempt.  The cost to Australia of reducing international collaboration by charities and their engagement in the public policy process would be extremely high.  Ideally the Bill will exclude Australian registered charities engaged in their normal activities and pursuing their legitimate charitable purpose, even if they have engaged in international collaboration.